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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Stonehenge?


Simply brilliant. How the ancients could have moved and placed the stones for Stonehenge. This is a great companion piece to the recent National Geographic magazine article on Stonehenge.

Amazing how this guy could figure out something that has eluded and confounded scholars for centuries. He not only figures it out, but demonstrates it!

This guy could build a replica of Stonehenge single-handedly, while a committee of 20 or 30 civil engineering professors from leading universities would be debating how it might be done.

I know it's off-topic. I thought some of you might find it interesting.
 

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that guy has way too much time on his hands...he should go off-roading or something!

BUT, that's pretty amazing, and he makes it look so simple.
 

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He's barely figuring that out? I've done that for years...let me find my videos!

Uhm...ok, just kidding, that was sweet, time consuming but very cool and could be the explanation for Stonehenge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When I saw it, I thought immediately of Ockham's Razor.

William of Ockham was a Franciscan Friar who lived in the 1300's. Essentially, his principle states: "All other things being equal, the simplest solution is the best." In other words, when multiple competing theories are equal in other respects, the principle recommends selecting the theory that introduces the fewest assumptions and postulates the fewest entities.

Who knows how the ancients did it, but this does fit within the principle of what William of Ockham said a long time ago.

A bit of trivia: Umberto Eco wrote a book, later a feature film staring Sean Connery called, The Name of the Rose. Eco's main character, William of Baskerville (played by Connery) is based loosely on the historical William of Ockham. I recommend the movie highly. Along with his apprentice Adso of Melk (named after the Benedictine abbey Stift Melk, a historical figure), the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville journeys to an abbey where a murder has been committed. As the plot unfolds, several other people mysteriously die. The protagonists explore a labyrinthine medieval library, the subversive power of laughter, and come face to face with the Inquisition. It is left primarily to William's enormous powers of logic and deduction to solve the mysteries of the abbey.




 

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Very cool! Its amazing what is possible with out modern tools.

It will be interesting to see how he get the top stones in place.
 

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uphill said:
When I saw it, I thought immediately of Ockham's Razor.

William of Ockham was a Franciscan Friar who lived in the 1300's. Essentially, his principle states: "All other things being equal, the simplest solution is the best." In other words, when multiple competing theories are equal in other respects, the principle recommends selecting the theory that introduces the fewest assumptions and postulates the fewest entities.

Who knows how the ancients did it, but this does fit within the principle of what William of Ockham said a long time ago.

A bit of trivia: Umberto Eco wrote a book, later a feature film staring Sean Connery called, The Name of the Rose. Eco's main character, William of Baskerville (played by Connery) is based loosely on the historical William of Ockham. I recommend the movie highly. Along with his apprentice Adso of Melk (named after the Benedictine abbey Stift Melk, a historical figure), the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville journeys to an abbey where a murder has been committed. As the plot unfolds, several other people mysteriously die. The protagonists explore a labyrinthine medieval library, the subversive power of laughter, and come face to face with the Inquisition. It is left primarily to William's enormous powers of logic and deduction to solve the mysteries of the abbey.




Great Movie.

Hey Larry, have you heard of Corral Castle, Florida. Back 50-60 years ago, a Eastern European gentleman built a "castle", singlehandly, moved stones wieghing up to 30 tons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_Castle
 

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That was pretty awesome. We showed the link to my Dad; and he's worked construction for 30+ years. He said that he used to do something similar with ladders and beams when there was no one to help.

Then he found out about the beam lifts you cranked by hand that could be rented. heheheh. LOL!!!! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think that the Egyptians must have used similar principles in construction of the pyramids at Giza.
 

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Simplest always works the best. So much for UFOs helping out in building stonehedge or the pyramids ;)
 
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