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2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

This chapter should contain guidelines of how to react in certain situations, i.e., coming across individuals or groups on trail runs or out in the back country who may be involved in illicit activities or wrong doings. It should also contain information on how to make a proper report to the law enforcement agencies including what to say, what not to say, and the specific information they will want to know.
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (5) Safety & Security

Working Copy

Title:
Safety and Security

Subtitle:
Blah Blah Blah

Heading 1:
Trail Dangers

Heading 1 Body:
Some of the trail dangers you can run across vary from critters with no legs (snakes), to critters with 2 legs (humans) and 4 legs (bears, wildcats, and other predators). Being prepared and having a plan of action prior to encountering these critters will increase your chances of survival exponentially. Blah Blah Blah, add more about the other forms of trail dangers, insects, rock slides, avalanche, flash floods, etc... An ounce of prevention is worth a ton of first aid:

Heading 2:
Animal Reptile and Insect Encounters
Heading 2 Body:

Heading 3:
Snakes

Heading 3: Body
Blah Blah Blah

  • Wear long pants and boots taller than the ankle.
  • Avoid tall brush and deep, dark crevices.
  • Make plenty of noise and vibration while walking.
  • Do not approach snakes, avoid them.
  • Do not expect rattlesnakes to make any noises.


Heading 2:
Human Encounters
Heading 2 Body:

While on the trails, you may encounter armed humans. These humans may be enjoying the activities of hunting or target shooting. Most of these humans are not a threat to you, so a simple wave and quick "Howdy" are appropriate, and you are on your way. Others may be protecting their interest in an illicit business, such as the manufacture, packaging, transfer sale, or disposal of illegal substances. These are to be considered predatory. As with all predators, they are more scared of you than you are of them. So, your best bet is to stay away from them and they will not bother you.

However, there may be times when avoidance is not possible. In those cases, the "R" on your gear selector may be the best protection you have. Get out. However, if, as a VERY last resort, you must stand and fight (as in, there is NO path of escape), resort to your best weapon available. You are driving a 3000 pound weapon. Duck, hit the gas, and listen for that "thump." But as I said, have a plan. Have a back up plan as well. After the thump, THEN get out. Remember, your safety and the safety of your passengers/trail buddies is most important. When meeting at the pre-run driver's meeting, discuss this and other possible scenarios.

Having a crappy plan is better than not having a plan at all.

Heading 1:
Natural Dangers
Heading 1 Body:

Heading 2:
Flash Floods

Heading 2: Body
Blah Blah Blah (Run away to high grounds)

Heading 2:
Rock Slides

Heading 2: Body
The usually rapid downward movement of newly detached segments of bedrock.

  • Pay attention to road signs warning of falling rock
  • If you are working as a volunteer in any of the national Forests, you are required to wear a hardhat near areas that are prone to falling rocks.
  • Just because there's no signs posted it doesn't mean you're safe. Stay alert at all times and be cautious of where you set up camp or stop to rest.

Heading 1:
Security

Heading 1 Body:


Heading 2:
Campsite Security

Heading 2 Body:
When setting up camp, make sure that the same practices you have in the city are followed in the wilderness.

  • Lock your FJ, but be sure to have a key/remote with you.
  • Put away all foods when going to sleep for the night (bears/other critters).
  • "Circle the Wagons." Park the FJs around the perimeter of the campsite for visual protection (concealment) of the campsite. This also helps the kids feel safer, like being enclosed in a tent.
  • Bring along a dog....they make GREAT campsite alarms!

If you can, make sure someone there has both lethal and less-than-lethal means of protection. If you bring firearms, make sure the law allows carrying weapons on the trail/expedition. Understand the dangers of "bringing of weapons to a fight" (ie guns, knives, clubs) and that they are likely to be used against you if you are not 100% capable of using them. Always use common sense when in the campsite with weapons. Let a couple of the adults know you are carrying, but it's not a good idea to let the younger kids know. Keep the weapon under your immediate control at all times - never leave it in an unlocked vehicle or unsecured where someone else may get a hold of it. DO NOT USE INTOXICANTS while in possession of a firearm! Guns and alcohol/drugs do not mix. Be mindful of your surroundings....tragedies occur when you shoot first and ask questions later. Know your target before putting your finger on the trigger. Most National Forests allow carrying of exposed and loaded firearms if they also allow hunting, some National Parks do not. As firearm restrictions vary from place to place, you must check with the local authorities prior transporting a firearm into the area or risk being arrested and your weapon confiscated as evidence until your hearing. People with valid Concealed Weapon Permits or active/retired law enforcement are exempt from most statutes governing carrying concealed weapons. The reasons for the less-than-lethal weapons are many. Just make sure you choose the right tool for the job. I wouldn't suggest using a taser on a bear. The following is a list of such less-than-lethal weapons:

  • Bright Light
  • Civilian Tasers
  • Pepper Spray
  • Using whatever you have at hand

Heading 2:
Contacting Law Enforcement

Heading 2 Body:
On many trails, cell phones work. So, simply dial 911, and you will be connected to law enforcement. However, many trails or expeditions are so far removed that cell phones are good for nothing more than playing games. Other communications are necessary, such as short wave radio, HAM radio, CB radio (VERY limited distance), or satellite phone. Whenever you go on a trail, whether it's a short run up a 1 hour fire trail, or a 3 day expedition to Death Valley, ALWAYS let someone know where you are going, when you are leaving, and when you will be back, along with your "flight plan." At the very least, when you don't call or show up within 4 hours of your expected return time, your family can get the search teams out to you quickly. *Note* This may be good for more than just ths section*

When contacting law enforcement, the first things they will ask for are your name and a call back number. The information they will expect from you are the common "Who, What, When, Where, and How" questions to be answered. This may seem tedious, but the best record of what happened is when the incident first happens. As time goes on you will forget necessary details, so they want as much of it on tape as possible.

Get a description of the parties involved. Gender, race, age, and start from the top down: Hat (color, logo, type), shirt (type, color, any logos, long or short sleeve), pants/shorts (color, type), and shoes color, type). Remember the direction you last saw them going in, and how long ago you last saw them. Remember any weapons they had, or they said they had (simulated a handgun in the waistband, or you saw a black semi-auto handgun, etc). Remember any statements they may have made to you, as this will be VERY helpful in the investigation. Lastly, if they have a vehicle, get the vehicle description and license number. Remember any stickers, body damage, or other unique identifying characteristics (loud exhaust, rims, tinted windows, and other modifications) of the vehicle and the last direction you saw the vehicle going.

If you are tending to an injured person, have someone else call and give this information. If you are alone with the injured person, relay this information to the dispatcher/call taker while giving first aid to the injured party. You can't get help unless you call, so don't put off calling for help!

Heading 2:


Heading 2 Body:


Heading 2:

Heading 2 Body:
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (5) Safety & Security

I'll be working on some stuff to post here. For you other coppers, feel free to add to it, or correct my post.
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Under Security,

Subheading: Campsite Security

When setting up camp, make sure that the same practices you have in the city are followed in the wilderness.

Lock your FJ, but be sure to have a key/remote with you.

Put away all foods when going to sleep for the night (bears/other critters).

"Circle the Wagons." Park the FJs around the perimeter of the campsite for visual protection (concealment) of the campsite. This also helps the kids feel safer, like being enclosed in a tent.

Bring along a dog....they make GREAT campsite alarms!

If you can, make sure someone there has both lethal and less-than-lethal means of proection. If you bring firearms, make sure the law allows carrying weapons on the trail/expedition. Also use common sense when in the campsite with weapons. Let a couple of the adults know you are carrying, but it's not a good idea to let the younger kids know. Keep the weapon under your immediate control at all times - never leve it in an unloced vehicle or unsecured where someone else may get ahold of it. DO NOT USE INTOXICANTS while in possession of a firearm! Guns and alcohol/drugs do not mix. Be mindful of your surroundings....tragedies occur when you shoot first and ask questions later. Know your target before putting your finger on the trigger. Most National Forests allow carrying of exposed and loaded firearms if they also allow hunting. Know the law before you get in a tight spot. If you are unsure, call the Rangers and ask. People with calid Concealed Weapon Permits or active/retired law enforcement are exempt frm most statutes governing carrying concealed weapons. The reason for the less-than-lethal weapons are many. Just make sure you choose the right too for the job. I wouldn't suggest using a taser on a bear.



More to follow.......
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Subheading: Trail Dangers

Some of the trail dangers you can run across vary from critters with no legs (snakes), to critters with 2 legs (humans) and 4 legs (bears, wildcats, and other predators). Being prepared and having a plan of action prior to encountering these critters will increase your chances of survival exponentially. This section will cover human encounters.

While on the trails, you may encounter armed humans. These humans may be enjoying the activities of hunting or target shooting. Most of these humans are not a threat to you, so a simple wave and quik "Howdy" are appropriate, and you are on your way. Others may be protecting their interest in an illicit business, such as the manufacture, packaging, transfer sale, or disposal of illegal substances. These are to be considered predatory. As with all predators, they are more scared of you than you are of them. So, your best bet is to stay away from them and they will not bother you.

However, there may be times when avoidance is not possible. In those cases, the "R" on your gear selector may be the best protection you have. Get out. However, if, as a VERY last resport, you must stand and fight (as in, there is NO path of escape), resort to your best weapon available. You are driving a 3000 pound weapon. Duck, hit the gas, and listen for that "thump." But as I said, have a plan. Have a back up plan as well. After the thump, THEN get out. Remember, your safety and the safety of your passengers/trail buddies is most important. When meeting at the pre-run driver's meeting, discuss this and other possible scenarios.

Having a crappy plan is better than not having a plan at all.



More to follow....
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Subheading: Contacting Law Enforcement

On many trails, cell phones work. So, simply dial 911, and you will be connected to law enforcement. However, many trails or expeditions are so far removed that cell phones are good for nothing more than playing games. Other communications are necessary, such as short wave radio, HAM radio, CB radio (VERY limited distance), or satellite phone. Whenever you g on a trail, whether it's a short run up a 1 hour fire trail, or a 3 day expedition to Death Valley, ALWAYS let someone know where you are going, when you are leaving, and when you will be back, along with your "flight plan." At the very least, when you don't call or show up within 4 hours of your expected return time, your family can get the search teams out to you quickly. *Note* This may be good for more than just ths section*

When contacting law enforcement, the first things they will asl for are your name and a call back number. The information they will expect from you are the common "Who, What, When, Where, and How" questions to be answered. This may seem tedious, but the best record of what happened is when the incident forst happens. As time goes on you will forget necessary details, so they want as much of it on tape as possible.

Get a dscription of the parties involved. Gender, race, age, and start from the top down: Hat (color, logo, type), shirt (type, color, any logos, long or short sleeve), pants/shorts (color, type), and shoes color, type). Remember the direction you last saw them going in, and how long ago you last saw them. Remember any weapons they had, or they said they had (simulated a handgun in the waistband, or you saw a black semi-auto handgun, etc). Remember any statements they may have made to you, as this will be VERY helpful in the investigation. Lastly, if they have a vehicle, get the vehicle description and license number. Remember any stickers, body damage, or other unique identifying characteristics (loud exhaust, rims, tinted windows, other mods) of the vehicle and the last direction you saw the vehicle going.

If you are tending to an injured person, have someone else call and give this information. If you are alone with the injured person, relay this information to the dispatcher/call taker while giving first aid to the injured party. You can't get help unless you call, so don't put off calling for help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Dave, Does the Working Copy look correct? I did some minor rearranging to attempt to classify things better so a quick look at the TOC should get you to the right area quickly.
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

I like the way you have arranged it, added bullet points, and made it readable (compared to my blobbed-up format ;D) Good job!
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Dave, as far as i know, there are no firearms permitted in National Parks. Also the danger of bringing of weapons to a fight (ie guns, knives, clubs) and that they are liking to be used against you if you are not 100% capable of using them. Also, maybe a list of less lethal option; pepper spray civilian tasers, bright light, using whatever you have at hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Hans, I added the items you suggested in purpple except the list of less-than-lethal which came out white cuz I'm a lame programmer... ;) Please review and comment if you think it looks OK. After I hear looks good from you and Dave, I will change the color to white.
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Looks good, dave anything else you want to add/edit to my contribution?
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Ok looks great! I was unsure about weapons since I saw guys just walking around in Mojave with rifles. But that's a state park, right?
 

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

Not sure, i thought it was BLM. I love how we have no less than 3 federal park ranger services and systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

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Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

i stand corrected. Put in there then that one needs to reearch local ordinances about weapons regulations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Re: 2009 SCFJC Field Guide (6) Safety & Security

OK, propsed additions are purple and proposed deletions are red. Whattya think?
 
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