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This chapter should contain descriptions of the different terrain types and techniques used to wheel in each type.
 

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Title:
Wheeling

Subtitle:
Wheeling, American slang for Off-roading, is a term for driving a specialized vehicle on unpaved roads, such as sand, gravel, riverbeds, mud, snow, rocks, and other natural terrain. To ensure the most enjoyable time, be willing to listen and learn from those more experienced drivers and practice the following tools, techniques and proper trail ettiquette at all times.

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Trail Etiquette

Heading 1 Body:
Etiquette is a code that influences the expectations and behavior of those in society. Use the following guidlines to ensure you are acting appropriately on trail runs in order to create an environment that is enjoyed by all, not just the members of your trail run.

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Leading a Trail Run

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As a "Trail Boss" it is your responsibility to ensure the safety of all in your group. Have a drivers meeting before running a trail to inform the drivers of obsticles they can expect, what form and channel of communications will be utilized and the hear any concerns from the members on your trail run. Try to get a feel for the noob's and place them strategicaly in the convoy to follow the line of someone willing to train the guy behind him.

  • Warn others of approaching obstacles or oncoming traffic.
  • Notify others in advance when preparing to stop on a trail so they can find a safe place to pull over.
  • Stay in regular contact with your "Tail Gunner" if you do not hear them, ask for someone to relay.
  • Keep your group on the designated trail.
  • If there is ample room for oncoming smaller vehicles or people to pass, pull over. If there is not, contact the oncoming traffic and inform them of the large number of vehicles in your group and ask that they pull to the side.

Heading 2:
Member of a Trail Run

Heading 2 Body:
Blah Blah Blah

  • Dont follow too closely
  • When stopping on a trail, pull to the side leaving enough room for oncoming traffic.
  • You are responsible for the vehicle behind you. If the distance of your follower is getting too great, slow down.
  • Yield to smaller vehicles, people and wildlife.

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Heading 2:

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Heading 1:
Tools & Techniques

Heading 2:
Airing Down

Heading 2: Body:
Correct tire pressure is vital to a safe and successful off-roading trip and can be the difference between enjoying your trail run or spending hours recovering your vehicle from any number of traction related issues. The most difficult thing about using this technique is determining what works best for your vehicle.

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A-Trac

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Differential Lock

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Auto LSD

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Heading 2:
Vehicle Stability Control (VSC)

Heading 2: Body:
Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Toyota's name for Electronic Stability Control (ESC) is a computerized technology that improves the safety of a vehicle's handling by detecting and preventing skids. When ESC detects loss of steering control, ESC automatically applies individual brakes to help "steer" the vehicle where the driver wants to go. Braking is automatically applied to individual wheels, such as the outer front wheel to counter over steer, or the inner rear wheel to counter under steer. Toyota's ESC system also reduces engine power until control is regained.

If your vehicle came with a VSC disable switch or you have modified your vehicle in any way to disable this important safety function while off-road (for the purposes of burning out or doing donuts) it is imperative you enable this function before returning on the highway where you will be travelling at higher rates of speed.

Heading 2:
Left Foot Braking

Heading 2 Body:
The main purpose of this technique is to smooth the ride as you pass through uneven terrain, generally rock gardens but can be used in other situations too. The benefits of a smooth ride are for more than just comfort. Damage will be less severe or even non-existent in cases where clearance of vital components is compromised. Think of slamming your rig down on some large rocks versus gently setting it on them.

  • With your transfer in low gear and your AT in low, apply pressure to the brake with your left foot then gently apply pressure on the gas pedal to bring the RPM up to 1500 (this is the number I like, you will find your favorite in time.)
  • Begin to release pressure off of the left foot ever so gently to allow the vehicle to creep forward.
  • As you begin to move through your uneven terrain, you will find that the vehicle will move trough the obstacle much more smoothly especially when dropping off on the back side of large rocks. Without the brake being applied, the vehicle will want to slam down but because the brake is applied, there is too much resistance for it to slam down and it just comes down soft and gentle (comparatively speaking)

Heading 1:
Terrain

Heading 2:
Water Crossings

Heading 2 Body:
The following blah blah blah

  • Know your fording Depth! You do not want to stall your vehicle in a water crossing.
  • Travel through the water at just fast enough to keep a small bow wave in front of your vehicle. This will keep the water level lower inside the engine compartment.
  • If your vehicle dies in the water, tow it out, remove the spark plugs and turn the engine over to remove the water. Check and change all fluid oils as soon as possible to avoid permanent damage to the power train components.
  • Do your Scuba Driver mod.


Heading 2:
Hills

Heading 2 Body:
Blah Blah yadda Blah

  • Know what is on the other side.
  • Climb in low gear
  • Use the left foot braking technique to overcome obstacles while ascending or descending a hill.
  • While travelling downhill, choose a good straight line and avoid turning into holes that could cause your vehicle to roll.

Heading 2:
Off Camber

Heading 2 Body:


Heading 2:
Mud

Heading 2 Body:
The following are guidelines for driving in Mud

  • Never enter a mud pit without checking its depth first. Know what your vehicle is capable of and find alternate routes if necessary.
  • Choose straight line paths when crossing mud and avoid turning your wheels. Turning will create drag and can slow you down or even bring you to a halt.
  • Enter the mud pit strong. Build enough momentum to carry you through yet not too much that you will need to apply brakes or loose control.
  • If you anticipate a large spray of mud covering your vehicle when entering a mud puddle, turn on your windshield wipers right before you enter the mud puddle. This will ensure that you will have visibility and prevent loading up your windshield with heavy amounts of mud that the wipers may not be able to clear.
  • If your tire tread is loading up, try spinning the tires to throw the mud out of the tread. This may provide more traction.
  • When you are done in the mud, inspect and remove excess mud off of the drive shaft and any other moving parts before travelling at any substantial speeds. The dried mud can put these spinning components off balance and create big problems. Spraying the wheel wells and other undercarriage components with WD-40 prior to entering the mud will make the cleanup much easier.


Heading 2:
Snow

Heading 2 Body:
Blah Blah Blah

  • Allow extra stopping distance.
  • Make all changes in velocity (starts, stops, turns, acceleration, deceleration) very gently so as to avoid losing traction.
  • Give extra space whn following other vehicles.
  • Remeber to gradually steer in the opposite direction if you start to spin out, but do not overcorrect as it will make matters worse.
  • Allow for extra stopping distance and begin braking early.
  • Always be aware of the potential for "Black Ice" and slow down!


Heading 2:
Sand:

Heading 2 Body:
 

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NOT a moderator!
Joined
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
here is my contribution to get this section started...

Title:
Wheeling

Subtitle:
This needs something clever... ;)

Heading 1:
Techniques

Heading 2:
Airing Down

Heading 2: Body:
Correct tire pressure is vital to a safe and successful off-roading trip and can be the difference between enjoying your trail run or spending hours recovering your vehicle from any number of traction related issues. The most difficult thing about using this technique is determining what works best for your vehicle.

Heading 2:
Left Foot Braking

Heading 2 Body:
The main purpose of this technique is to smooth the ride as you pass through uneven terrain, generally rock gardens but can be used in other situations too. The benefits of a smooth ride are for more than just comfort. Damage will be less severe or even non-existent in cases where clearance of vital components is compromised. Think of slamming your rig down on some large rocks versus gently setting it on them.

1. With your transfer in low gear and your AT in low, apply pressure to the brake with your left foot then gently apply pressure on the gas pedal to bring the RPM up to 1500 (this is the number I like, you will find your favorite in time)
2. Begin to release pressure off of the left foot ever so gently to allow the vehicle to creep forward.
3. As you begin to move through your uneven terrain, you will find that the vehicle will move trough the obstacle much more smoothly especially when dropping off on the back side of large rocks. Without the brake being applied, the vehicle will want to slam down but because the brake is applied, there is too much resistance for it to slam down and it just comes down soft and gentle (comparatively speaking)

Heading 1:
Terrain

Heading 2:
Water Crossings

Heading 2 Body:
The following blah blah blah
1. Know your fording Depth! You do not want to stall your vehicle in a water crossing.
2. Do your Scuba Driver mod.
3. Travel through the water at just fast enough to keep a small bow wave in front of your vehicle. This will keep the water level lower inside the engine compartment.
4. If your vehicle dies in the water, tow it out, remove the spark plugs and turn the engine over to remove the water. Check and change all fluid oils as soon as possible to avoid permanent damage to the power train components.

Heading 2:
Hills

Heading 2 Body:
Blah Blah yadda Blah
1. Know what is on the other side.
2. Climb in low gear
3. Use the left foot braking technique to overcome obstacles while ascending or descending a hill.
4. While travelling downhill, choose a good straight line and avoid turning into holes that could cause your vehicle to roll.

Heading 2:
Off Camber

Heading 2 Body:


Heading 2:
Mud

Heading 2 Body:
The following are guidelines for driving in Mud
1. Never enter a mud pit without checking its depth first. Know what your vehicle is capable of and find alternate routes if necessary.
2. Choose straight line paths when crossing mud and avoid turning your wheels. Turning will create drag and can slow you down or even bring you to a halt.
3. Enter the mud pit strong. Build enough momentum to carry you through yet not too much that you will need to apply brakes or loose control.
4. If you anticipate a large spray of mud covering your vehicle when entering a mud puddle, turn on your windshield wipers right before you enter the mud puddle. This will ensure that you will have visibility and prevent loading up your windshield with heavy amounts of mud that the wipers may not be able to clear.
5. If your tire tread is loading up, try spinning the tires to throw the mud out of the tread. This may provide more traction.
6. When you are done in the mud, inspect and remove excess mud off of the drive shaft and any other moving parts before travelling at any substantial speeds. The dried mud can put these spinning components off balance and create big problems. Spraying the wheel wells and other undercarriage components with WD-40 prior to entering the mud will make the cleanup much easier.

Heading 2:
Sand:

Heading 2 Body:
 

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2009 SCFJC Field Guide 2 Wheeling

In my yard, most anytime, under most anything Not so much a secret, but advice. Always shoo the snake away before replacing the hide spot. If you are not careful, you can smoosh the poor snake.
 

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Dude this post hudge and looking pretty detailed. I'll take the time just before I pass out to bed.
 
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